• SR English Composition Book Table of Contents

    Use the following list to help you organize your Composition book. The numbered items should be written EXACTLY as you see it here in your Table of Contents. The lettered items ("a") are descriptions to better help you remember what we did and what should be in that section of the notebook. Don’t forget to include a page number on your Table of Contents where these items can be found (Please note I will NOT have page numbers here in order to not confuse anyone). I will continue to update this list each week and repost it to my website. Due dates for notebook checks will be announced several days prior to turning in the Composition book.

     

    Item #    Title

    1.  Steve Jobs, "How to Live"
      1. Watch the video attached to my Senior Handouts and Links section then write down a minimum of 5 direct quotes from Steve. You will use these in an assignment directly after the film. The quotes remain in your comp book.
    2. It's All Perspective...
      1. Watch http://schooltheworld.org/ and write about expectations for GPS versus difference in a standard College Prep English class- What might be expected of their perspective?
    3. Epic Heroes -
      1. Where does history and legend influence our cultural heroes and modern heroes of today? How did the stories of your past help influence who YOU are?
    4. Beowulf
      1. Points to Ponder. Answer the questions in your Comp Book. 
    5. "For it is now to us itself ancient"
      1. Follow the prompt below for Beowulf and answer in your comp book.
      2. "For it is now to us itself ancient; and yet its maker was telling of things already old and weighted with regret, and he expended his art in making keen that touch upon the heart which sorrows have that are both poignant and remote. If the funeral of Beowulf moved once like the echo of an ancient dirge, far-off and hopeless, it is to us as a memory brought over the hills, an echo of an echo."  

        (J. R. R. Tolkien, from " Beowulf: The Monsters and the Critics")

        1. What do you think this quotation means?
        2. How does it change your perception of Beowulf, to consider that at the time it was written down it already was an old tale?
        Why would you describe universal themes evident in ancient and medieval literature as things that are, as Tolkien writes, "both poignant and remote"?